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CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 9:00am EST
quote believed to be located outside the united states." now if the government wants to engage in electronic surveillance targeting a united states person for foreign intelligence purposes, it must go back to the fisa court and it must get a specific order from that court. in an emergency the surveillance can commence before the court order is issued, but the government still must have probable cause to believe that the united states person is an
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 2:00pm EST
need to back loans and banks were not in the mood to gamble on real-estate so the government would try to make banks feel more secure. the housing act of 1934 created the federal housing administration, the fha. provides insurance to banks who know they get their money back but even with the f h a, banks still might feel nervous. they might want somebody to buy those mortgages from them. in that same housing act of 1934 congress made provisions for a new breed of privately-owned firms called national mortgage association's. they were to buy fha insured loans. just one problem. no private investors wanted to do it. so finally four years later, 1938, the roosevelt and ministration created the federal national mortgage association which became known as fannie mae. was a tiny federal agency. what brought that companies would not do uncle sam would. this was not considered big news at the time. the wall street journal buried the story on page 2 and it was only eight sentences long. i want to point out that was before i started at the journal. otherwise we would have had a bigger story and i
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 9:00am EST
of slavery? well, last week the federal government as it does, you know, once or twice a year came out with its latest figures on birthrights. and in particular on one i'm going to point to is the illegitimacy rate or out-of-wedlock births. here they are. 72.3% of african-americans now are born out of wedlock. 72.3%. american indians, 66.2%. latinos, it's 53.3%. for whites it's still pretty high, but it's 29.1 percent. and for asians it's 17.2%. so in other words, seven out of ten, six out of ten, five out of ten for blacks, american end yangs and latinos. these are the so-called underrepresented minorities that get racial preferences. and then fewer than three out of ten and fewer than two out of ten for whites and aiz items -- asians, people who are typically discriminated against. it is no accident that these figures line up quite well with how well different groups are doing not only in terms of education, but in terms of crime and, you know, whatever social indicator you want. that is the real problem. and, of course, that is not going to be fixed by racial preferences and univers
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 12:00pm EST
boundary to implement. the order required the government to obtain a warrant and show probable cause. these are the same basic commonsense protections we've had in place for other types of searches. this development required individualized and particular orders from the fisa court to conduct investigations. let's fast forward to 2001. president bush decided in secret to authorize the national security agency to start a new program of warrantless surveillance inside the united states. this is in complete contravention of the fourth amendment and complete contravention of the law at that time. as i'm sure and many of my colleagues will certainly recall this was revealed to the american public four years later when it was reported in "the new york times" in 2005. and in response after years of back and forth contentious debate, congress passed the fisa amendments act, the bill that we are considering on this floor today. we're considering a reauthorization. this law gave the government new surveillance authorities, but it also included a sunset provision to ensure that congress ex
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 12:00pm EST
there's always been a role for government support of private industry. going all the way back to alexander hamilton. i tell people you don't have to read the "world the flat" to understand what we have to do in a global competitive world. read alexander ham hamilton's rt on manufacturing, ten pages, and me makes the argument. he says in a world where we are competitive with other nations and other nations are setting up industries, we need to make sure that we have fair trade. we have to make sure that we are providing incentives, economic incentives for new industries, clean technology, could almost get the justification for funding -- for funding that through hamilton's argue. hamilton makes the argument that we need infrastructure and roads to support manufacturers. he makes the argument that we need the right tax incentives, and that we need a right of work force that is educated. jefferson has the view that the government needs to support manufacturing. now, this becomes the american economic system and influences henry, abraham lincoln, and is the governing philosophy of
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 7:15am EST
by that? >> because there wasn't just the war unfold on the ground in afghanistan. all our government decide to search more forces to of top a new strategy to try to stabilize the country. i discovered that all of this, the key organs of our american bureaucracy actually wound up fighting with one another. we had was within the pentagon. you would think that if you're sending more troops to afghanistan, those troops would go to places that were most critical, the places that the taliban were seeking to take over, the places that were most at risk, potentially a takeover of the country. instead, we wound up sending the first wave of new forces took part of the country with relatively few people. and i discovered the answer was simply tribal rivalries. not in afghanistan but in the pentagon. it turned out that the first wave of troops were u.s. marines. they wanted to bring their own helicopters, the own logistics. so they did was to work with u.s. army soldiers in the areas in and around the city of kandahar. it was this tale of our own services fighting with each other instead of figh
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 9:00am EST
. they were passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so states like mississippi, states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california, arizona, north carolina are all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. really does three from 1964 to two dozen eight could be thought of as kind of the carried of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. if you think about every president elected from 1964-2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected. he was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year perio
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 5:00pm EST
for circumstances when the government searches through its database of captured communications looking for information on individual american citizens. otherwise, by means of these so-called backdoor searches, the government may conduct significant warrantless surveillance of american persons. i believe this current practice is inconsistent with core fourth amendment privacy protections and needs to be reformed. during consideration of fisa in the judiciary committee, senator durbin and i introduced a bipartisan amendment to address this very problem. the language of our amendment is identical to that offered by senators wyden and udall during consideration of fisa by the select committee on intelligence. the amendment clarifies that section 702 does not permit the government to search its data base of fisa materials to identify communications of a particular united states person. in effect, it would require the government to obtain a warrant before performing such queries involving an american person's communications. the amendment is limited in scope. it excludes from the warrant req
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:30am EST
a concentrated power in the entire american history. one looked at the union government and the structure of the state's and the confederacy and said that was the lead by a fine state. the united states never had a government that big until the new deal. fin day had to build this enormous central state. think of that. they passed taxes within a year. and agents of the federal government literally taking food out of people's barnes. the only way to feed the army. that is fascinating that the slaveholders go to war to protect slavery than they think the new government will protect their slaves during war but it turns out they needs to use them to win the war. added it is an enormous tussle the also wrote a clause in the constitution that congress could never abolish slavery. they had a problem of sovereignty. they could not reach the slaves. they cannot reach them without the permission of the owner. they had codified the status of slaves as private property. can you imagine they were mortgaged up to the eyeballs. they all must talk about the angle, the powerful ally and to say slays don't
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 4:15pm EST
that with fans.hrough you can use facebook, twitter, youtube, and, you know, tolea topple a government. gove it's harder to put down aardto revolution occurring over the web than kill a charismatic leader or bomb headquarters. you can make progress by the way it's spread out, but if you're . itizen on facebook, you may not realize what you are getting yourself into. in part it's because facebook's what you terms 'rof service shift without warning. servi shift initially when you joined, they said we'll just share with your friends, people you designate. in 2009, they changed it to make your friends' pictures and names public. well, they were american citizens with friends and relatives in teheran, and thesen as ricans were critics of the iranian government. what happened was, you know, without their knowledge or of consent, the pictures areat public. their friends and relatives wers be beat up, were jailed, and soiens forth. something even as simple as your friends can make a difference.ls edin the past years, there's ben highs and lows in twitter, andd yo've seen the arab spring.d, we've seen t
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:00pm EST
into england. fly them over there, seized the airfield. the shock might be so great that the british government will cave in or negotiate your instead what the germans did was, of course they stop at the ocean. then he turned south and they wanted to knock france out of the war, which is what they did. they entered paris on june 16, i think. the government in paris led to the south. they were practically in a different city every day. and churchill hoped and pleaded with the french to continue fighting. both countries have pledged, one to another, that they would not drop out of the war and make a separate peace, unless they were released from this pledge by the other. the french began to think that they would want to make a separate peace, and they began to talk to the british about this. churchill said no, we can't release you from that pledge. we want you to keep fighting all the way down to the mediterranean, if you have to. and if you have to across the mediterranean, keep fighting from north africa. and a big part of the reason was that the french fleet was a very, very large fleet. many
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 3:30pm EST
deal, but in the case of the fiscal cliff, no deal is the worst deal because the government will go over the fiscal cliff and will take almost every american with us. almost every family that pays taxes now will pay higher taxes. people's jobs will immediately be put in jeopardy, unemployment compensation will end for more than 2 million people, our defenses will be decimated by cuts that will put us in a position of accepting really unacceptable risks to our security, title 1 programs of education for low-income children will be cut dramatically, most people, including the congressional budget office, our own congressional budget office, say that the combination of tax increases along with the decreased spending required under the budget control act will push our economy back into recession in the new year. so i don't agree that no deal is better than a bad deal. in this case, i repeat, no deal is the worst deal because it allows our country to go over the fiscal cliff and really hurts almost every american family in our country, in our economy, as a whole. this shouldn't be a surp
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 9:00pm EST
of the confederation, that government is too weak so we are starting to write the constitution. this is where the second amendment obviously comes. how did this all develop? >> guest: nowadays it's become fashionable among the people that support them rights strongly to pick out this or that quotation from that leader like samuel adams or thomas jefferson or whoever and implied that in the second amendment is basically seen as a rate of the individuals to defend themselves and defend themselves against the government when it became tyrannical. that is a misunderstanding. it was a political matter in the second amendment. it was a part of what became the bill of rights, and the reason for it is that when -- after the unhappy experience of the articles of the confederation led the founders to try to figure out a better way of governing this country, they came up with a constitution that is full of checks and balances, but as it was submitted to the states for the ratification it became clear that they might not get the nine states they needed unless there were promises of still more controls ov
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 8:30pm EST
i will carry the report to london. they decided they could not afford it. the royal government sent their own report. so in 1775 that is why the massachusetts government was not willing to spend the money. they knew they could be skipped if they did not. >>. >> we will continue questions downstairs. also signings of the book. let's continue downstairs. for our panelists. robert, a tired, and john todd andrlik is a publisher of raglan did, >> it is always a treat to be in this store it is a wonderland. about five years ago a friend suggested that i share rightabout ms. green. [laughter] i said to? she was called the which up on wall street. she was interesting but finance and wall street? then it was 2008. and everything changed the stock market collapsed collapsed, real-estate prices plunged and we were in a financial panic i started to think more about ms. green and how she's survived ms. green and how she's survived many financial crisis. there were no diaries then i remember something that was said that nice girls keep diaries. bad girls do not have time last laugh and hetty gree
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:30am EST
reports on the military and government failings in the war in afghanistan. nancy gives him an editor at large and michael duffy, executive editor for time magazine chronicle the relationship between the u.s. presidents in the president's club in side the world's most exclusive fraternity. political commentator kevin phillips recounts what he believes was the most important year of the american revolution which was 1775, a good year for revolutions. for an extended list of links to various publications, 2012 novel book selections visit the book tv website, booktv.org or our facebook page facebook.com/booktv . >> up next on book tv, richard wolff and david bersamian talk about our economic crisis and argue that it can be traced back to the 1970's when our economic system shifted from benefiting a vast majority of americans to one which mostly benefits only the very rich. this is about an hour-and-a-half. [applause] >> good to see you will hear. let's cut quickly to the chase. what is it and the dna of capitalism that makes this so unstable? >> since the beginning of economics as a disc
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 1:30pm EST
't think of going to anything else. and as long as we can function and show the world that we can govern as we disagree, that will be the example that will forever make our country the best and hopefully be a model for others to not think you have to take to the streets, not think that you need guns to have the government that you want but to show that peaceful transition can be done and also that we can have a lot of discussion, a lot of disagreements, but we can do it civilly, and i leave this body knowing that if we just remember the honor that we have of growing up in the greatest nation on earth, that we will know that it is our responsibility to give the same to our children and grandchildren. and it's the least we can do. thank you, madam president. i yield the floor and suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: mr. brown: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from ohio. mr. brown: i ask unanimous consent top dispense with the quorum call. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. brown: madam president, i
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 12:00pm EST
against the government when it became tyrannical. that is a misunderstanding. it was a political matter, the second amendment. that's partly what what became the bill of rights. the reason for it is after the unhappy experience of the articles of confederation, but the founders to figure out a better way of governing this country, they came up with the constitution, which as we know is full of checks and balances, but as was submitted to the states for ratification, it became clear that they might not get the nine states they needed unless their promises but still more controls over the potential for the federal government overstepping its powers and crashing the states, which was not the object. so the agreement was to come up with a set of amendments to it. and make that the first order of business when congress convened. but that promise when they did get the nine states to ratify and it went into effect in congress that it may be the first thing they started discussing this amendment. to make a long story short, instead of sprinkling them into this or that provision of the articles
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 6:00pm EST
over the cliff and do nothing, nearly every government program will be hit with the same percentage cut, and that includes social services, education, research and infrastructure, all of the things that we need to grow our fragile economy. the calm act gives the office of management and budget discretion and flexibility to recommend what programs and what agencies and accounts to cut. if o.m.b. fails to do the job, then the sequestration across-the-board cuts kick back n of course the final word rests right here with us in congress. o.m.b.'s decision with be overridden by a joint resolution. every provision of the calm act o the senate. in fact, at one time or another, nearly every feature of this plan has been offered by both republicans and democrats, including president obama and speaker boehner. all i've done is pull them together to offer them has a compassionate alternative to what happens if we go over the fiscal cliff. true, from the very beginning i have favored a comprehensive solution to put our fiscal house in orderings something along the lines of the simpson-bowles. we don
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 10:00am EST
-given, or the laws given from god to the people and it bubbles up word to the rumors. it gives us the government of the people, by the people and for the people that lincoln referred to. common-law stand in stark opposition to almost every other nation on earth that has developed some form of civil law come in which law trickles down from the top. both germany and england had common-law for a while, but by the 20th century both have more or less abandoned it. germany more so than england. therefore, by the end of world war ii, when you have unloaded however unwillingly its colonies, those colonies were themselves designed on principles of civil law. us, the first two pillars taken together mean that a christian, protestant religion influenced and shaped everything about american foundation of laws and defined its system of personnel rights. it wasn't just that the united states was a democratic republic, but that the very premises of what a democratic republic meant were likely to be far different in the united states than anywhere else. the second of, third of the pillars involves economic free
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 8:30pm EST
important single commodity. the south refuse to sell cotton unless the british and french government recognize its independence, which put tremendous pressure on europe to intervene in favor of the confederate. the european statesmen at the beginning of 1862, considered the unions caused to be hopeless. quote it is the highest degree likely that the north will not be able to subdue the south. british prime minister lord pomerance and told us for an officers. meanwhile, the lincoln government appeared overwhelmed. congress and the white house were in the hands of a political party that it never government before. the treasury department was broke. federal spending was multiplied as never before. in 1862, the u.s. government spent six times as much money as it spent in 1861. and where would it come from? northern banks, and an economic panic had closed their exchange windows in late december, refusing to redeem paper money. meanwhile, rebel soldiers menace washington from nearby manassas virginia where they had routed the union army a few months earlier. confederate artillery they atom
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 6:00pm EST
begin to realize they need a stronger federal government to reroute archons dictation. many, many americans were posted to comp dictation and he became the anti-federalist. they were the federalist and anti-federalist, bitterly opposed to each other from the very beginning, from the signing of the constitution. the anti-federalist gradually became no as republican and democrat republicans. so when john quincy adams was running for office, you now how the republicans or democrat republicans running against the federalist and he was the last of the federalists. the federalist rambis from the beginning, washington and the people who ran the country were really friendly elite. the constitution only other property owners. gradually universal suffrage came in, not universal involving women. don't get your hopes up too high it was white male suffrage, but she didn't have to be a property owner and that was what pushed to the elite out of power. adams, jefferson, monroe's, all these great plantation owners and property owners and elite leaders really permitted the growth of jacksonian dem
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:00pm EST
of government, nothing was more important than the maintenance of the system. i will close here by segway to something that might give you a little more than an idea of what is specifically in this book. five differences between the original tea party and today. were five reasons they should have seen their losses coming. [laughter] you have to amuse yourself. [laughter] the original tea party was conducted on british ships as a raid by the sons of liberty, composed largely of working men, sailors, traitors, and storekeepers. today, the so-called tea party and sons of liberty represent the most conservative of the republican party. number two is the original sons of liberty orchestrated an armed rebellion against the british, so that american government could be formed. contemporary tea party and sons of liberty members enjoy the benefits of that very government. they just don't seem very happy that much of the time. number three, most of the wealth in the american colonies was held by british subjects who oppose the common when two parties of the day. every tea party's will happily tell
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 5:00pm EST
the longstanding recommendation of the government accountability office that the department perform a strategic review that they carry at the necessary security measures that the diplomats abroad and ensure that all necessary actions are present to prevent a recurrence. i know there will be an attempt to shift the responsibility for the tragedy to a shortage of resources. requests for more money are a familiar refrain in the state department reports. but budgetary constraints or not a factor in the department's failure to recognize the threats and adequately respond to this situation in benghazi that is and about misplaced priorities. if this department intends to blame its long string of failures on an adequate funding, then perhaps it should take a closer look at the money that is being lavished on the global climate change, colin marie diplomacy programs another fever project. this money could have been used for providing diplomatic security including hiring additional personnel and providing them with adequate equipment and training. this report and this hearing are just the beginning of ou
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 7:00am EST
people, human rights and most importantly deserved democratic governance. shea stoked the flames in a peaceful way for a lasting change even among those already in a position of power. her efforts have helped lead us to where we are today. there has been a lot of advancement and debate in burma over the last two years and we must recognize and give thanks to all those who had the courage to lead and support the changes in burma including those in the present government. we also must honor and remember those who made the great sacrifices, imprisonments, lives lost, to get to where we are today. too many paid too high a price in the effort to bring about freedom and democratic governance in burma. it is with those people in mind, those who have sacrificed so much, to acknowledge the work that is not done yet. we must insure that the momentum and folds into sustained progress, into a permanent freedom and democracy. as much as i would like to believe that change that has occurred is irreversible, as much as i would like to revel in wind optimism and believe the battle for freedom wa
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 1:00pm EST
goodness, what's going to happen? there won't be any more u.s. government bonds because we're going to be out of the debt situation. we saw -- we saw it on the horizon when george w. bush became president, he decided to go back, backwards on rates across the board from the wealthiest to the middle to the poor, and he put two wars on a credit card and we are where we are where we are. and to add to this history, we all know that we're coming out of the worst recession since the great depression. it has been difficult, led by, unfortunately, some unscrupulous people on wall street who created a nightmare in the housing market. i remember saying to treasury secretary paulsen can you explain the rule of derivatives here and what happened and how we got into this crisis? and he put his head in his hands, mr. president, and he said not now. i'll talk to you later. now, that's not a very encouraging thing when the secretary of the treasury puts his head in his hands and says i can't explain it now. so we're coming out of this difficult time, and guess what -- we're doing much better. we ha
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 12:45am EST
to government and different sets of divisions and values and everything he did in that timeframe he kept trying to tethered to this big idea and when i wrote to the book of course we didn't know how things would end up on november 6, 2012, but i looked at how she developed the governing strategy, and they're really culminated in november, so this is the back story to what happened in this presidential campaign. >> david korn, showdown is the most recent book and we are here at the national press club. >>> robert discusses the role that geography has played in shaping the defense and talks about the role that it plays in the future. this is about ten minutes. >> good evening, welcome and thank you for joining us. my name is richard fontaine. i'm the president for the center of new american security. it's a pleasure to welcome you all here to celebrate the publication of robert kaplan's new book the reason geography what they tell us about the coming conflict in the battle against the state. i've heard it said before that you all very great author by reading his books not by buying them -- they w
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 10:00am EST
, and it would each without utterly beknighted agricultural policies followed by until federal government with subsidizing -- that was a pleatly unnecessary aside -- completely unnecessary aside, i apologize for that. [laughter] originally, it was moved over vast distances in that quite tasty form of whiskey. we then moved to pigs which are, of course, corn with feet -- [laughter] b we have always preferred salted pork to salted beef, and then once this character, armor, figures out about refrigerated rail cars, you put the blocks of ice on top rather or than below the beef so that cold water drips down, you're able to have a single great stockyard in chicago which is moving that, those corn-fed beef in a cost efficient manner east. now, even though cities form for utterly prosaic reasons, miracles happen when smart people come to being around each other, when they learn from one another. think about athens 2500 years ago, or think about florence 600 years ago in the age of the me dissi where a city built on wool and banking, a city who connected brilliant people and learned from one anot
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 12:00pm EST
. this morning they approve and extension of the farm intelligence v it allows the government to continue intercepting overseas communication. it extends legal immunity phone companies that help the government wiretap the domestic phone calls. president obama plans to sign the bill. when the senate is back we are expecting senators to continued work on the $60 billion hurricane sandy relief package. negotiations continue on avoiding the so-called fiscal cliff. both parties head to the white house today to discuss the fiscal cliff with the president. it's at 3:00 p.m. eastern in the oval office. senate in recess until 2:00 p.m. eastern when the senate reconveneses, live coverage here on c-span2. >>> and right now on c-span2 a conversation with nebraska senator ben nelson who is retiring after two terms. >>> retiring senator nebraska ben tell me sop. years that began with the 2003 recount and reended with re-election of president obama. if you could think of the adjective to describe these years what would it be? >> clearly interesting. challenging. sometimes totally frustrating. but also f
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 9:45am EST
the government has been reluctant to make, but reflects actuarially. so there you have a volatile cocktail of politics and religion because the weapon, the motivation of the soldiers is to create an islamic state in nigeria. it's not something anybody troon says. it's the cds crossing each other and centrists we want an islamic state. in fact, one of the leaders went so far when the government's political leaders were proposing amnesty and so on. the secretion into that convert everyone to sit down and negotiate with him. and so each time you hit the government said please come talk to us, we will listen now. you said it so often and they know very well what the motivation is. that is the reason for the devastation of the north today, a kind show in which after years of independent, certain sections of the country considered the rest non-muslims, whether they're christian, whatever as subhuman. disposable material. a very interesting thing happened, however. some of these recent effort training came back holier than their masters. in other words, were fully indoctrinated, fully ideologist
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:00am EST
and the government's failings in the war in thoroanistan. ...n w well-known face for c-span viewers mary frances berry professor at the university of pennsylvania also of the author of several books. we're at the university of pennsylvania to talk to her about and justice for all. the united states commission on civil rights in the continuing struggle for freedom in america quote. when did this all rights commission begin? >> 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussion with john foster dulles the secretary of state because of the races around the world people would hear about and read about and the fact there seemed to be episodes whether lynching or discrimination in the country. eisenhower said he would ask congress to set up a civil-rights commission to put the facts on the table and i am told by someone at the meeting he slammed the table and they will put the facts on the table. policy is sometimes said up because there is a tough problem is that the report then they go away but in the future would depend on what it found out and how aggressive it was in the public thought about it.
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:30pm EST
and whether the government would do anything about it. before they got to the question, there's a whole string of questions that turned out to be not unrelated, although it seemed like at the time. several reporters ask about the increase in soviet shipping traffic to the island of cuba and nobody knew what was happening and what that meant, but a couple more months we would know exactly what that was about. i was not in the end i related to a person was talking about in "silent spring." you could also hear the president referred to ms. carson spoke. he said we are going to look into this problem, especially in light of ms. carson's book. what's interesting is 1962, no further introduction was needed. rachel carson, the celebrated author of three books about the ocean, beautiful, lyrical books that were these wonderful transforming experiences for readers. carson had only taken science and translating it to beautiful narrative that everybody could relate to and so she'd become one of america's most celebrated a beloved authors in the silent spring turned a very different direction. "silent spr
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 8:00pm EST
will govern more in the mode of his first two years when he was governor of massachusetts? they uniformly said they'd be disappointed and in fact labrador one of the stars of the tea party featured in my book said there would be an insurrection. people say we have been really boisterous. you have seen nothing yet. if president romney behaves like a conservative it's going to be the death of the republican party. >> i am just going to let that sit there for a second and let that sink right in. [laughter] let's come back to the leadership. i want to ask you specifically as individuals and as a threesome that way they do or do not work well together, boehner cantor and mccarthy. characterize each one in shorthand beginning with speaker boehner. >> john boehner is a washington lifer and was not the obvious choice to be leading this sort of tea party crafts. nonetheless you can see the tea party phenomenon for the trade -- freight train that it was an elected to be on the train rather than underneath it. speaker boehner campaigned heavily for a number of the tea party freshman andy also you know be
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 7:15pm EST
supporter of the royal government and was driven out of town because the. >> on the other side of that, nobody is on many different sources of media that we can kind of fat check. how often was the president of the newspaper or drastic exaggeration and outright lies to gain support or to turn people directly to one side or the other? >> you're definitely finding exaggerations, whether it's drastic or not. but is interested in finding was that a lot of newspaper accounts came as disclaimers. so publishers of the newspapers, printers cite reliable sources and a thesaurus is questionable, they would frequently printouts of the article and some sort of disclaimer. >> i remember there is a letter published the battle of lexington and concord to talk to the british soldiers coming and rampaging through and killing the barnyard animals. that never happened. there is a letter about the battle of upper hill says it's in the soldiers reached charlestown, some of them try to desert and runaway and how two of them sprang up immediately. i didn't have any there. definitely propaganda pieces. fatah
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 11:15am EST
-term opponent to the u.s. government. and that gets him a lot of notoriety in the 19th century as well. >> so, where did brigham young come from and began his life? >> he grew up in basically a state western new york. he came from a very poor family. he didn't have any formal education. and was impoverished, really hard childhood. his family moved around a lot. once he was out on his own he moved around a lot. he was a craftsman, kind of a furniture paynter and never really got ahead. in his life entirely changed once he converted to mormonism when he was a little bit more than 30-years-old. >> so how did he need joseph smith etc? >> the book of mormon, shortly after it was published in 1830 some of his family members read it. he later said that he read it and he spent a lot of time thinking and out. he didn't jump on board right away, she was a little bit skeptical and a little uncertain and spend a couple of years considering the claim of this new work of scripture. then he encountered a group of traveling mormon elder is your missionaries and he sold them speak in tom. something that he ha
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 11:15pm EST
is the nature behind the compost devotee that is the proclamation of self-government is unnecessary and one need not apply reason or restraint in making the difficult decisions that one need only spot the party line that one must do it continually. a group of celebrities did a television ad in which they pledge allegiance to obama. this may differ in the degree but not in kind to any fascist salute and when in the world can we begin in this country pledging allegiance to human beings? [applause] i brought this a long because they wrote this great book. this is what my 13 year old child brought home from public school. are you a democrat or republican on gun control and democrat wants to restrict the number and republican wants to allow them to fight citizens without restriction. on the environment a democrat wants to make factories reduce pollution and restrict drilling for oil and park lands and a republican wants to not pass pollution laws delude cost factories money. this is in public school. if that isn't taxation without representation, i don't know what is. [applause] >> that's the left on
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 7:45am EST
many, many years. get the idea that somehow you can create this post a tribal big tent government that will pacify the country, i think is a bit of a dream. we will continue to have a messy chaotic future there for some time to come, unfortunately. >> rajiv, when we over in afghanistan to write this book? book? book? >> i traveled the initial in early 2000. i made 15 trips from 2009 through this year, many of them several weeks at a time. i traveled all over the country, but i emphasize my time in the south. i spent a lot of time with our military forces, with u.s. marines into helmand province, with army soldiers in kandahar, with american diplomats and reconstruction workers, and with the afghan people. traveled around by helicopter, by my is that trucks, pickup trucks, by donkey, and really -- >> we able to get out on your own? >> yes. fortunately, though i'm an american, i'm blessed with dark skin and this beard. >> did that make a difference? >> it did make a difference. it allowed me to blend in perhaps in ways it would be more difficult for you to do in kandahar. >> rajiv c
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 9:45pm EST
-- nobody thought ronald reagan was raising taxes to create a bigger government. they thought if he needed it, it must be serious. what we have today is no innovation. no reform, no new thinking, no creativity, no hearings on waste. no hearings of better ways of doings things. you live until the age of the ipad and the iphone, and of google and a facebook and twitter, and you're faced with a federal government which currently runs at the pace of manual typewriter. [laughter] you have no serious -- in that sense we're told by people who are running a disaster we need more of your money to prop up a disaster. we can't reform. it's a bipartisan failure. now the last thing i want it talk about is how washington would have dealt with this. washington is the most important single american. we would not have won the american revolutionary war without him. we might well not have gotten a constitution without him and might not have been able to find a orderly system of self-government. we stand on his shoulders. and washington was very big on listening to people who knew what they were doing. hesp
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 8:00am EST
into an intellectual question about the role of government. the person said government should not provide for the nutrition of children and it struck a chord with me because i don't think people think about what that would mean. we don't realize we live in a society where we make small amount of investments early, we make big investments lake. we all in fact are deeply invested in the success of kids because the more the economy grows, artists, teachers, professors and a entrepreneurs, children are the greatest natural resource we have in america, our children. my late -- this woman says this, i go back and she says why don't we see what it is like to live on food stamps or the snap program. i went to bed thinking no big deal. it was a big story. thiokol my staff. guess what i am doing? but it was a powerful thing. one of 14 cities in america with a food policy director and we had done a lot of work when trying to expand affordable health options. i said this is a great thing. we could not only raise levels of compassion and understanding and dispel that stereotypes about snap and things
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 11:00am EST
are a synthesized nation now where government thinking. wealth is considered mean. people who work for a living, that's mean. achievement is considered mean because somehow what you achieve was at the expense of somebody else. thinking about well for a minute, i'm going to jump ahead. the thing that drives me nuts is all the celebrities going for increase in taxes. so i thought about for a while and i look at their careers. a lot of them over a span of a decade got into the 20, 30, 40 million-dollar range salary. they're the ones who are saying we should raise taxes on people like me. but the people like them are not people like them. they are people in her 50s who work 35 years getting to a $2 million job. if you saved it you sound like you're defending the rich. but actually they are throwing the rich under the bus. there's a guy in his 50s who has five kids, a couple grandkids. he worked for that money. you didn't. you're an actor. [laughter] [applause] i would say hold your applause until the end but i kind of like if. [laughter] examples of this phony tolerance and what it does is the way
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 10:45am EST
at the age of 85 who confronted the government of china in the organization's interest. and by 2007 their world summer olympic games were held in shanghai. shriver also advised the u.s. catholic bishops in drafting a letter on nuclear war issued in 1983, and he worked to influence the reagan administration to accept a no-first-strike approach to nuclear weapons. in 1993 president clinton presented him the presidential medal of freedom. this bare bones account of sargent shriver's life and achievements suggests but does not describe the spirit of a man who was a devout catholic and an inspired and inspiring father. how can we understand the spirit and motivation of such a versatile and resilient man? striving to understand sergeant shriver, i think of the inflated clown toy perhaps two-and-a-half or three feet tall favored by 2-year-olds around the world. and at the rounded bottom of the toy, there is a bag of sand so that no matter how often you push him down, he springs back upright again. it's great fun if you're 2, but sargent shriver was like that his whole life. no matter how m
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 7:30pm EST
be protestant. i said what he think that? because of her in the her in the american government is protestant. he said that's. john kennedy was a protestant. so he said what are you? i'm jewish. they said no, you couldn't be jewish. why couldn't i be jewish? because you don't have an abhorrence. i choked. i said i have been cut off when i came into the foreign service. but i said it jokingly and he took it seriously. there's a picture in the book, which is in the american book thanks to john, not in the american book of michelangelo's moses, where he shows moses with horns and a famous translation of the bible, where it says torrents of light came down on mrs. firm had been. but the mistranslation, so michelangelo gave moses horns and that's where the story apparently came from. i did not horns. it couldn't possibly be jewish. there's a chap during their called lost in translation, which i like a lot because i look at what's up singing in the united states and whitsitt seen in spanish. very different things. things that are set in spain every day, which fantasy than in the united states, i'd be b
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 11:00pm EST
the federal government cannot let it be known. but they came out with the most recent figures great 72.5% of african americans now are born out of wedlock. 72.3%. american indians, 66.2%. latinos, 53.3%. white people, still pretty high, 29.1%. for asian people, it is 17.2%. so in other words, seven out of 10, six out of 10, five out of 10 for blacks and american indians and latinos because they are the so-called underrepresented in minority who get racial preferences. and a two out of 10 people are typically have racial problems. not only in terms of education but in terms of crime and whatever social indicators that you want. now, that is the real problem. of course, that is not going to be fixed by racial preferences. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, roger. now we will hear from alan morrison, who is the lerner family associate dean for public interest and public service law at the george washington university school of law. he is responsible for creating pro bono opportunities for students, bringing a wide range of public interest programs to the law school, encouraging students
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 4:15pm EST
the opposition, the government, or by these subgroups looking to make money in terms of ransoming off people back to the family. that's one whole aspect in any sort of civil war type situation, which it really is right now. you have the criminalization of society in many ways from people who are trying to make a living possible, and then you have groups that become invested in the civil war and the continuing of the civil war you saw something similar in lebanon. i wrote a piece recently in monitor called the lebanonizeation of syria, and unfarmly, of the many scenarios that could occur, in syria, because it does seem to be -- there's no easy answer. there is absolutely no easy answer to this. american intervention is not the answer. and i would be happy to talk more about that perhaps in the q & a session. what happened in -- what will happen probably in syria, unless the equation on one side or the ice dramatically changed. you have this balance of forces almost where neither side has the wherewithal to land the knockout punch and both sides think they can win and it's very difficult to interve
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 9:00am EST
with the government's first position on guantanamo bay was no-man's land they already rented from cuba the majority was to the extent that the law exists in guantanamo bay. there is no other power, certainly castro is not controlling what was happening there. so, to the government said habeas corpus doesn't extend to guantanamo bay so for that purpose of this part of the usa and a follow on cases in in the lower court so all of the returns are in. >> the next question is 1i know you never get. what is your view of the nomination process that comes from fort lewis and how might it be improved to make it less frustrating were demeaning to? >> it wasn't always the way it has been for the nominations. it would include our chief justice, justice alito, justice so why -- sotomayor and justice kagan. people decided to go along party lines. contrast that with the way that it was when i was nominated in 1993 in the justice breyer the following year. my biggest supporter of the senate judiciary committee was senator orrin hatch and he confirmed that and he wrote an autobiography in which he takes great pride
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 12:00pm EST
the cultural revolution. why? he says, because then you knew the government was the enemy, now you're not sure. [laughter] so i said you already want to bring up about a democratic system. they said yes. i'm not a law teacher. so after they say how much they're all favored the market, i said that's a very interesting question, point. i favorite. i favorite, but i've noticed from what i've read that there are millions of people in china who make just a few dollars a day. and they are on the own land and they're not very rich really. and you have quite a lot of money i gather. i was told. and suppose they also look, we are in the majority, and justice money down you. we're going to take it all away from you and give it to us. and the one who started this, i said to you favor that? if that's the result. he said i am in favor of democracy, but maybe not right now. [laughter] so you see, it's like a tiger by the tail. so you start looking at the other side, and they are afraid of a certain kind of chaos or of a certain kind of, and so somehow you have to, you have to, now that, that is partly, that
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:00pm EST
regulating environment where we put regulations and we would put government regulations that is a part of self regulation. we saw regulate ourselves and create rules for ourselves that is self regulation. we also regulate each other for competition. there is scarce resources just like in the rainforest but the main thing that keeps the rainforest fiber and is that you have the canopy which in the u.s. economy would be the first, wal-mart, all that. and then you've got all the small business, but it's the small and growing. it's the things that were small but can challenge and it's what happens when the big truth falls over and then the amazing thing is it grows right out of it, right out of their. that's a metaphor, but it's real. because when we lose something day in the economy it's vital that we know how to reconfigure the resources and create something new out of it. so, do we need control? we need feedback loops to repurchase in this country we need to build a robust platform for people to realize what they have inside of them. that's why people came to this country and why people
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:00am EST
and milton friedman. but his perspective, his favorite economist remarked one dublin, and canes, all very pro-government activist, statist from my perspective, i wanted a more balanced approach. saw want to highlight more of the free-market thinkers and what their role was. in fact, the heroic thinker in my book is adams that, the founder of modern economics i discovered by making him the central character of my book and his team of his system of natural liberty which is what he called it in the wealth of nations, i was able to actually tell a story. this book is actually a story that has a plot, hal adams smith and his system of natural liberty are treated overtime, how they come under attack by the marxist, the dublins, the keynesian sense someone, but have they are resurrected, brought back to life and even improved upon by the other schools of economics, the austrian school, chicago school of economics, and friedman and so forth. it's really a unique -- i think have done something really unique. and make a real story with a heroic figure who triumphs in the end. a true american story. the model i se
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 9:30am EST
include state officials. this would be public sector managers, government employees at high levels, ministers, the prime minister -- [inaudible] and, of course, folks very high up in the regime including their own family. the point is that these networks, or the point of the book is that the state business networks exist in every society. even in the united states. they are usually, usually not always, but usually corrupt and they siphon off a awful lot of money. however, in some areas, some countries there are checks and balances. much more so than others. and in a place like syria, these checks and balances were not consistent to prevent these networks that operate anywhere in the world from actually running the economy into the ground. >> so could you give some examples, number one, of this network that you talk about in the u.s., how it exists? >> in the u.s., for instance, after the invasion of iraq one of the major construction or reconstruction quote unquote ventures was, you know, commissions, somehow, or given somehow to various corporations that are very much in touch or
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:30pm EST
capturing the political process, getting the government contracts and affecting outcomes we are also subject to that. and to see somebody say those things is a lot more than i say in my book but what you are saying is true in its deeply important. >> philip auerswald, you write about the current telecommunications revolution that we are all living and trying to understand and manage. helpless. >> so, first of all, we have to understand the difference between a mobile phone and a rich country and a mobile phone and most of the world. so, before the mobile phone only to technologies had spread as widely as the mobile phone. no technology has spread as rapidly as the mobile phone. the only other recent one was the transistor radio and before that, it was fired to spread as wildly. so, what is the -- we know what it means in our lives and what smart phones been and all that but what does it mean for the majority of the world's population. it was built highways, communication highways and labor never connected before. in afghanistan we talk about story that you asked about entrepreneurs and was r
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